Senryu February

O

kay, CaptainGaijin, I put the word in bold so you can hurry your way to another site of your choosing. Cuz, here’s another senryu post. I’m talking about senryu in class today so as I was jotting down my thoughts, I thought I’d share some of them with you. No tuition necessary, although donations to the Onigiriman Relief Fund are appreciated.

Last year, we had six senryu salons and I was flattered with the everyone’s participation. There were a total of 56 different participants–a little less than quarter of my subscribers–but only 16 who participate 3 or more times. Oh well, that’s okay. I can’t imagine what I’d have done if all participated at once!

Anyway, after a half year of practice, I think we are getting the hang of this, and it is now time to take a step up, to really get into the meat of what senryu really is: A poetry that attempts to capture through a snapshot a satirical or poignant moment that highlights the foibles of man and the society in which he lives. Let’s take a brief look at the origins of senryu. According to The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001:

Senryu: a Japanese poem structurally similar to the haiku but primarily concerned with human nature. It is usually humorous or satiric. Used loosely, the term means a poem similar to the haiku that does not meet the criteria for haiku.

Okay, I teach at a college that would never be confused for Columbia, but this definition is far too “loose”, even if it admits to it. A senryu is NOT a haiku. The only thing they have in common is the syllable count.

Senryu is said to have come out of haikai–a form of linked verse in which three poets take turns composing poems that are related to only the previous poem. But haikai–originally comical–was “elevated” by Basho as a form that expressed deep human sentiments. There is also the view that the poetry of Basho’s late years was the prescursor if senryu–his poetry manifested the attitude of karumi–lightness–which focused on images of humans and the mundane features of their lives.

The bottom line is that no one is really sure where it “came” from…

But, we do know that its name came from a poet who mastered the form of comic–often irreverent–observations of human life: Karai Senryu (1718-90). Senryu–lit. meaning willow river–was a town official in Edo (modern day Tokyo) and a haikai poet, but more famous as a judge for maekuzuke–literally, attaching to the previous verse. In simple terms, the judge, or other noted haikai poet, would provide a 14 (7-7) syllable verse and participants would attach their 17 (5-7-5) syllable verse to complete it. Normally, the tsukeku–attached poem–had to respond to the judges verse, the maeku (previous verse), in a comical, amusingly unexpected way. This meant that many of the verses relied on puns or made fun of people in everyday life, especially the important people. Prizes were awared to those who were selected by the judge as superior.

In 1765, Senryu’s disciples published a collection of superior verses called Yanagidaru (willow barrel). What makes this collection significant is that it is the oldest extant collection of tsukeku without the maeku. In other words, the tsukeku had to stand by themselves. Interestingly, it was understood that many of the tsukeku could be edited by the judge, and as a result, most of the verses–even though written by many different people–were often associated with the judge…

And a genre was born.

Now, back to the original issue. What is the difference between haiku and senryu? Basically, haiku focuses on the nature, both natural and human, often expressing both the momentary and the eternal. Each verse must make reference to a season with a seasonal word. It must also have a kireji–cutting word–that separates the two essential parts of the poem.

Perhaps the most famous poem by Basho is:

古池やかはず飛び込む水の音

furuike ya kawazu tobikomu mizu no oto
old-pond (emphatic) frog  jumps-in water (attributive) sound

This haiku must have at least a million different translations. But you’ll have to live with mine:

Ah, an old pond
a frog jumps in
the sound of water

Strictly and grammatically speaking, it should read: Ah, an old pond–the sound of water into which a frog jumps. The effect of the relative clause–“into which a frog jumps”–gives the Japanese reader the sense of “the sound water makes when a frog jumps in.” In any event, the poem provides a seasonal word–frog–suggesting spring. It also conveys the eternal–old pond–and the momentary–sound of water. The effect is to express the universality of nature, both at once absolute and ever changing. The contradiction of this image speaks to the world itself, our world where things seem to be absolute, eternal and yet no so.

In contrast, senryu gets rid of nature. And it gets rid of the eternal, focusing only on the moment, usually a very human moment.

Cutting a fart
but it’s not even funny–
one living alone

While funny, this particular anonymous verse reveals the loneliness of the person. If there were others at home with him, cutting the cheese would arouse comment and maybe laughter, but when alone that would not be the case.

The wife is away
so he spends the whole day
looking for things.

A snapshot of the relationship between married couples. Actually, I can really relate to this poem, as I am always asking M where things are, especially in the kitchen.

In any case, the beauty of senryu–to paraphrase Haruo Shirane–is its ability to reveal human weaknesses and failings, and pointing out the contradictions we face in life.

So are you guys ready to write verse that can reveal human weaknesses and failings? Well, if you are particularly sarcastic and cynical–like me–then this should not be a problem. And for those of you cut from gentler, more optimistic cloth, you can at least pretend to be mean and cynical… Hahahahahha.

February’s Topic: forget, or any of its adjective or noun forms.

For some basic pointers–such as syllable count, grammatical structure–read this and this. Remember that I will accept only one senryu and in general the first one only. Be sure to submit your senryu to this post. I will leave a link on my front page. Sorry, participation is limited to subscribers only.

If you want to read previous submission, click on “previous senryu” above for quicker access.

Good luck.

Meetin’ Up

H

ave you ever wondered who leaves comments on your site? I’m sure that all of you have friends who leave comments, but there are also those whom you have never met, right? Now, don’t you wonder from time to time who they are? What they’re really like? And don’t you sometimes get the hankerin’ to meet them in the flesh?

Well, I have only met one so far, Ender. She was a person I met through other students who were studying in Japan. She ultimately matriculated to the school where I teach, and came to take a Japanese placement exam from me. When I saw her e-mail address, I thought, “Now where have I seen this name before?” Hahhahah. It was her. But she came to my site because she had met some of my students, so while it was fun to meet her, it was not that unusual.

The other day, I went to school and entered my office when I found the following note on the floor.

Again, I’m thinking, :”Where have I heard this name before?” Okay, I may sound stupid, but haven’t you ever met someone out of context and not immediately recognize the name or face? Well, I have, many times. And this time was no exception. After staring at the message for 5 minutes it finally sunk in. It’s SunJun. Hahhahahah. Damn! I wish I had been in when he came. I definitely would have liked to have met him. But unfortunately, it was not meant to be. Oh well. Maybe next time….

But on Saturday, I finally did meet someone, although it seems I sorta missed someone was well. But I’ll write about it later. For now, it’s time to sleep. I had a busy weekend, a long flight, and I’m exhausted…

Meetin’ Up

H

ave you ever wondered who leaves comments on your site? I’m sure that all of you have friends who leave comments, but there are also those whom you have never met, right? Now, don’t you wonder from time to time who they are? What they’re really like? And don’t you sometimes get the hankerin’ to meet them in the flesh?

Well, I have only met one so far, Ender. She was a person I met through other students who were studying in Japan. She ultimately matriculated to the school where I teach, and came to take a Japanese placement exam from me. When I saw her e-mail address, I thought, “Now where have I seen this name before?” Hahhahah. It was her. But she came to my site because she had met some of my students, so while it was fun to meet her, it was not that unusual.

The other day, I went to school and entered my office when I found the following note on the floor.

Again, I’m thinking, :”Where have I heard this name before?” Okay, I may sound stupid, but haven’t you ever met someone out of context and not immediately recognize the name or face? Well, I have, many times. And this time was no exception. After staring at the message for 5 minutes it finally sunk in. It’s SunJun. Hahhahahah. Damn! I wish I had been in when he came. I definitely would have liked to have met him. But unfortunately, it was not meant to be. Oh well. Maybe next time….

But on Saturday, I finally did meet someone, although it seems I sorta missed someone was well. But I’ll write about it later. For now, it’s time to sleep. I had a busy weekend, a long flight, and I’m exhausted…

Meetin’ Up

H

ave you ever wondered who leaves comments on your site? I’m sure that all of you have friends who leave comments, but there are also those whom you have never met, right? Now, don’t you wonder from time to time who they are? What they’re really like? And don’t you sometimes get the hankerin’ to meet them in the flesh?

Well, I have only met one so far, Ender. She was a person I met through other students who were studying in Japan. She ultimately matriculated to the school where I teach, and came to take a Japanese placement exam from me. When I saw her e-mail address, I thought, “Now where have I seen this name before?” Hahhahah. It was her. But she came to my site because she had met some of my students, so while it was fun to meet her, it was not that unusual.

The other day, I went to school and entered my office when I found the following note on the floor.

Again, I’m thinking, :”Where have I heard this name before?” Okay, I may sound stupid, but haven’t you ever met someone out of context and not immediately recognize the name or face? Well, I have, many times. And this time was no exception. After staring at the message for 5 minutes it finally sunk in. It’s SunJun. Hahhahahah. Damn! I wish I had been in when he came. I definitely would have liked to have met him. But unfortunately, it was not meant to be. Oh well. Maybe next time….

But on Saturday, I finally did meet someone, although it seems I sorta missed someone was well. But I’ll write about it later. For now, it’s time to sleep. I had a busy weekend, a long flight, and I’m exhausted…

Senryu February

O

kay, CaptainGaijin, I put the word in bold so you can hurry your way to another site of your choosing. Cuz, here’s another senryu post. I’m talking about senryu in class today so as I was jotting down my thoughts, I thought I’d share some of them with you. No tuition necessary, although donations to the Onigiriman Relief Fund are appreciated.

Last year, we had six senryu salons and I was flattered with the everyone’s participation. There were a total of 56 different participants–a little less than quarter of my subscribers–but only 16 who participate 3 or more times. Oh well, that’s okay. I can’t imagine what I’d have done if all participated at once!

Anyway, after a half year of practice, I think we are getting the hang of this, and it is now time to take a step up, to really get into the meat of what senryu really is: A poetry that attempts to capture through a snapshot a satirical or poignant moment that highlights the foibles of man and the society in which he lives. Let’s take a brief look at the origins of senryu. According to The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001:

Senryu: a Japanese poem structurally similar to the haiku but primarily concerned with human nature. It is usually humorous or satiric. Used loosely, the term means a poem similar to the haiku that does not meet the criteria for haiku.

Okay, I teach at a college that would never be confused for Columbia, but this definition is far too “loose”, even if it admits to it. A senryu is NOT a haiku. The only thing they have in common is the syllable count.

Senryu is said to have come out of haikai–a form of linked verse in which three poets take turns composing poems that are related to only the previous poem. But haikai–originally comical–was “elevated” by Basho as a form that expressed deep human sentiments. There is also the view that the poetry of Basho’s late years was the prescursor if senryu–his poetry manifested the attitude of karumi–lightness–which focused on images of humans and the mundane features of their lives.

The bottom line is that no one is really sure where it “came” from…

But, we do know that its name came from a poet who mastered the form of comic–often irreverent–observations of human life: Karai Senryu (1718-90). Senryu–lit. meaning willow river–was a town official in Edo (modern day Tokyo) and a haikai poet, but more famous as a judge for maekuzuke–literally, attaching to the previous verse. In simple terms, the judge, or other noted haikai poet, would provide a 14 (7-7) syllable verse and participants would attach their 17 (5-7-5) syllable verse to complete it. Normally, the tsukeku–attached poem–had to respond to the judges verse, the maeku (previous verse), in a comical, amusingly unexpected way. This meant that many of the verses relied on puns or made fun of people in everyday life, especially the important people. Prizes were awared to those who were selected by the judge as superior.

In 1765, Senryu’s disciples published a collection of superior verses called Yanagidaru (willow barrel). What makes this collection significant is that it is the oldest extant collection of tsukeku without the maeku. In other words, the tsukeku had to stand by themselves. Interestingly, it was understood that many of the tsukeku could be edited by the judge, and as a result, most of the verses–even though written by many different people–were often associated with the judge…

And a genre was born.

Now, back to the original issue. What is the difference between haiku and senryu? Basically, haiku focuses on the nature, both natural and human, often expressing both the momentary and the eternal. Each verse must make reference to a season with a seasonal word. It must also have a kireji–cutting word–that separates the two essential parts of the poem.

Perhaps the most famous poem by Basho is:

古池やかはず飛び込む水の音

furuike ya kawazu tobikomu mizu no oto
old-pond (emphatic) frog  jumps-in water (attributive) sound

This haiku must have at least a million different translations. But you’ll have to live with mine:

Ah, an old pond
a frog jumps in
the sound of water

Strictly and grammatically speaking, it should read: Ah, an old pond–the sound of water into which a frog jumps. The effect of the relative clause–“into which a frog jumps”–gives the Japanese reader the sense of “the sound water makes when a frog jumps in.” In any event, the poem provides a seasonal word–frog–suggesting spring. It also conveys the eternal–old pond–and the momentary–sound of water. The effect is to express the universality of nature, both at once absolute and ever changing. The contradiction of this image speaks to the world itself, our world where things seem to be absolute, eternal and yet no so.

In contrast, senryu gets rid of nature. And it gets rid of the eternal, focusing only on the moment, usually a very human moment.

Cutting a fart
but it’s not even funny–
one living alone

While funny, this particular anonymous verse reveals the loneliness of the person. If there were others at home with him, cutting the cheese would arouse comment and maybe laughter, but when alone that would not be the case.

The wife is away
so he spends the whole day
looking for things.

A snapshot of the relationship between married couples. Actually, I can really relate to this poem, as I am always asking M where things are, especially in the kitchen.

In any case, the beauty of senryu–to paraphrase Haruo Shirane–is its ability to reveal human weaknesses and failings, and pointing out the contradictions we face in life.

So are you guys ready to write verse that can reveal human weaknesses and failings? Well, if you are particularly sarcastic and cynical–like me–then this should not be a problem. And for those of you cut from gentler, more optimistic cloth, you can at least pretend to be mean and cynical… Hahahahahha.

February’s Topic: forget, or any of its adjective or noun forms.

For some basic pointers–such as syllable count, grammatical structure–read this and this. Remember that I will accept only one senryu and in general the first one only. Be sure to submit your senryu to this post. I will leave a link on my front page. Sorry, participation is limited to subscribers only.

If you want to read previous submission, click on “previous senryu” above for quicker access.

Good luck.

Meetin’ Up

H

ave you ever wondered who leaves comments on your site? I’m sure that all of you have friends who leave comments, but there are also those whom you have never met, right? Now, don’t you wonder from time to time who they are? What they’re really like? And don’t you sometimes get the hankerin’ to meet them in the flesh?

Well, I have only met one so far, Ender. She was a person I met through other students who were studying in Japan. She ultimately matriculated to the school where I teach, and came to take a Japanese placement exam from me. When I saw her e-mail address, I thought, “Now where have I seen this name before?” Hahhahah. It was her. But she came to my site because she had met some of my students, so while it was fun to meet her, it was not that unusual.

The other day, I went to school and entered my office when I found the following note on the floor.

Again, I’m thinking, :”Where have I heard this name before?” Okay, I may sound stupid, but haven’t you ever met someone out of context and not immediately recognize the name or face? Well, I have, many times. And this time was no exception. After staring at the message for 5 minutes it finally sunk in. It’s SunJun. Hahhahahah. Damn! I wish I had been in when he came. I definitely would have liked to have met him. But unfortunately, it was not meant to be. Oh well. Maybe next time….

But on Saturday, I finally did meet someone, although it seems I sorta missed someone was well. But I’ll write about it later. For now, it’s time to sleep. I had a busy weekend, a long flight, and I’m exhausted…

Senryu Tsubame 2004

T

he top scorer last year was a young Korean man living in St. Louis. I think he’s an engineer of somekind, something that just blows my mind. How can an engineer have the sensitivity of a poet? Hahahhaha. Just kidding, of course. Anyway, SunJun has placed first twice. His poetry is rarely contrived. He is straight forward–in Japanese, sunao 素直–presenting images that also convey a great understanding of the moment. The following on the topic “waiting” is a good example.

Stomach in tight knots,
white corsage in trembling hands,
Waiting at her door

Who can forget the nervousness of a first date or that great high school event, the senior prom. The verse captures the moment of picking up his date and those few moments of waiting at the door, so long and yet too short. The corsage is a great image to use, as it conveys to the reader to precise occasion and setting.

Right on the heels of SunJun is msbLiss. Her senryu often capture the moment in an insightful way, as she did with the topic, “air conditioner”.

thighs fused to vinyl
even the cat is panting
U-haul’s AC dead

The image is great, and illustrates our dependence on a cool environment in our modern world. The U-haul underscores modernity, reflecting how we often must move around in this busy world–the cat particularly reflects pulling up roots and moving to a new place. And the thighs fused to the vinyl seat? Doesn’t that almost put you right there?

In third place is Sammy. He has consistently submitted senryu that place him somewhere in the top. Whenever I read his submissions, I get the sense that his words are directly from his own experiences, a snapshot of his own life.

Diploma in hand,
Under the gaze of parents,
Tears fall from their eyes

This is a nice moment in time when parents shed tears when they see their baby graduating. Of course, the tears could be shed for a number of reasons: joy at seeing success, sadness at seeing the child take another step toward independence, or relief that they will finally be able to afford that second honeymoon to Tahiti. But only Sammy would know?

Okay, so there you have it. I’m not sure if I will continue doing these senryu salons. They are fun for some, but not for all, apparently. Today, a former student of mine IMed me, saying that when he comes here and sees the word senryu, he automatically goes to another site. Oh well, can’t please all the people all the time. Personally, I enjoy doing them, but it is time consuming, and I have enough things to grade for class as it is… We’ll see…

Senryu Tsubame 2004

T

he top scorer last year was a young Korean man living in St. Louis. I think he’s an engineer of somekind, something that just blows my mind. How can an engineer have the sensitivity of a poet? Hahahhaha. Just kidding, of course. Anyway, SunJun has placed first twice. His poetry is rarely contrived. He is straight forward–in Japanese, sunao 素直–presenting images that also convey a great understanding of the moment. The following on the topic “waiting” is a good example.

Stomach in tight knots,
white corsage in trembling hands,
Waiting at her door

Who can forget the nervousness of a first date or that great high school event, the senior prom. The verse captures the moment of picking up his date and those few moments of waiting at the door, so long and yet too short. The corsage is a great image to use, as it conveys to the reader to precise occasion and setting.

Right on the heels of SunJun is msbLiss. Her senryu often capture the moment in an insightful way, as she did with the topic, “air conditioner”.

thighs fused to vinyl
even the cat is panting
U-haul’s AC dead

The image is great, and illustrates our dependence on a cool environment in our modern world. The U-haul underscores modernity, reflecting how we often must move around in this busy world–the cat particularly reflects pulling up roots and moving to a new place. And the thighs fused to the vinyl seat? Doesn’t that almost put you right there?

In third place is Sammy. He has consistently submitted senryu that place him somewhere in the top. Whenever I read his submissions, I get the sense that his words are directly from his own experiences, a snapshot of his own life.

Diploma in hand,
Under the gaze of parents,
Tears fall from their eyes

This is a nice moment in time when parents shed tears when they see their baby graduating. Of course, the tears could be shed for a number of reasons: joy at seeing success, sadness at seeing the child take another step toward independence, or relief that they will finally be able to afford that second honeymoon to Tahiti. But only Sammy would know?

Okay, so there you have it. I’m not sure if I will continue doing these senryu salons. They are fun for some, but not for all, apparently. Today, a former student of mine IMed me, saying that when he comes here and sees the word senryu, he automatically goes to another site. Oh well, can’t please all the people all the time. Personally, I enjoy doing them, but it is time consuming, and I have enough things to grade for class as it is… We’ll see…

Senryu Standings 2004

H

ere are the final standings for all subscribers who participated in 2004. The score is based on a 5 point system. 5 for 天 Ten, 4 for 地 Chi, 3 for 人 Jin, 2 for 三客 Sankyaku and 1 for all other participating subscribers.

Now, as you should all know, it is not about the winning. It never is. The purpose of art–and life in general–is to participate. And as participants, you experience something different, making yourself all the more unique and special–even if you are just dabbling. I believe this in my heart. When I went to Japan, I studied at Nihon University. There, I met a professor who researched Edo Period senryu. I told him my father practiced senryu poetry and that even I had tried my hand in it. He looked at me and said in a tone that I suppose he meant to be polite, “I don’t really read amateur poetry.” My pride was not so much hurt as I was disturbed by this attitude. Isn’t particpating in any fashion the first step to learning? And even if you don’t make it your life’s work, did you not at least learn something new, and maybe something about yourself? And that alone has value?

I swore that I would never be that kind of teacher. I enjoy sharing my experience–what I know, what I have learned–with my students, hoping the assignments I give them, the readings they do, the projects they are “forced” to do, will expand their horizons even a little, making them more open, more experienced, more accepting and ultimately better people. I want them to enter my world, even if for a taste, in the hopes that they too will grow into adults who will be willing to let others into their own worlds. No judgments, no discrimination.

And this is why I hold these “salons”, modest as they are. I want you to taste a little bit of my world, and I hope to share in what you have to offer.

Anyway, here is a list of scores of all participants this year, led by SunJun and msbLiss. Tomorrow, I will talk a little bit about their poetry.

name may june july aug sept dec total
SunJun 2 1 1 5 5 2 16
msbLiSs 2 1 5 4 2 1 15
SammyStorm 1 4 july 3 2 dec 10
imahima 4 1 1 2 1 dec 9
XanthochromeSum may 5 1 1 1 1 9
whonose may 2 july 1 1 5 9
RachelsMommy may june july 2 4 3 9
bane_vixen 1 1 2 1 sept 2 7
tim00 5 1 july aug sept dec 6
SleepingCutie may 2 2 1 1 dec 6
pallyatheart 1 3 1 aug sept dec 5
detachable 2 1 july aug sept 2 5
LaMangust may june 3 1 sept 1 5
AznQuarter may june july aug 1 4 5
onigiri may june 1 1 3 dec 5
crotchety_old_man 3 june july 1 sept dec 4
SweetLilV may 2 1 aug 1 dec 4
eechim may june 1 2 1 dec 4
ChiisanaHoshi may june 2 aug 2 dec 4
those_days may june 4 aug sept dec 4
cgran may june 1 1 1 dec 3
ddsb2000 1 1 july aug sept dec 2
gt_ninja 1 june july aug 1 dec 2
sputtum 1 june july aug sept dec 1
globalguy007 1 june july aug sept dec 1
nefarious_hatter 1 june july aug sept dec 1
Grom may 1 july aug sept dec 1
ikerton may 1 july aug sept dec 1
silvermyst_ashke may 1 july aug sept dec 1
wildkat03 may 1 july aug sept dec 1
zhuzhu may june 1 aug sept dec 1
fooky11 may june 1 aug sept dec 1
No1watching may june 1 aug sept dec 1
Simply_Marie may june 1 aug sept dec 1
ekin may june july 1 sept dec 1
Link_Strife may june july 1 sept dec 1
dawn_1o9 may june july 1 sept dec 1
SweetLilV may june july 1 sept dec 1
fyzle may june july 1 sept dec 1
Momo5 may june july 1 sept dec 1
sekura81 may june july 1 sept dec 1
Fongster8 may june july aug 1 dec 1
Simply_Lynne may june july aug 1 dec 1
jcangel311 may june july aug 1 dec 1
silvermyst_ashke may june july aug 1 dec 1
kizyr may june july aug 1 dec 1
shiroi_norite may june july aug 1 dec 1
tinkarrific may june july aug 1 dec 1
iiSoNySoUnDii may june july aug 1 dec 1
DaddyLike may june july aug sept 1 1
Allanwr may june july aug sept 1 1
HANDI_411 may june july aug sept 1 1
SleepyWalnut may june july aug sept 1 1
WolferasDreams may june july aug sept 1 1
Di_Gah_Jea may june july aug sept 1 1
SENSEI49 may june july aug sept 1 1
may june july aug sept dec total

Senryu Standings 2004

H

ere are the final standings for all subscribers who participated in 2004. The score is based on a 5 point system. 5 for 天 Ten, 4 for 地 Chi, 3 for 人 Jin, 2 for 三客 Sankyaku and 1 for all other participating subscribers.

Now, as you should all know, it is not about the winning. It never is. The purpose of art–and life in general–is to participate. And as participants, you experience something different, making yourself all the more unique and special–even if you are just dabbling. I believe this in my heart. When I went to Japan, I studied at Nihon University. There, I met a professor who researched Edo Period senryu. I told him my father practiced senryu poetry and that even I had tried my hand in it. He looked at me and said in a tone that I suppose he meant to be polite, “I don’t really read amateur poetry.” My pride was not so much hurt as I was disturbed by this attitude. Isn’t particpating in any fashion the first step to learning? And even if you don’t make it your life’s work, did you not at least learn something new, and maybe something about yourself? And that alone has value?

I swore that I would never be that kind of teacher. I enjoy sharing my experience–what I know, what I have learned–with my students, hoping the assignments I give them, the readings they do, the projects they are “forced” to do, will expand their horizons even a little, making them more open, more experienced, more accepting and ultimately better people. I want them to enter my world, even if for a taste, in the hopes that they too will grow into adults who will be willing to let others into their own worlds. No judgments, no discrimination.

And this is why I hold these “salons”, modest as they are. I want you to taste a little bit of my world, and I hope to share in what you have to offer.

Anyway, here is a list of scores of all participants this year, led by SunJun and msbLiss. Tomorrow, I will talk a little bit about their poetry.

name may june july aug sept dec total
SunJun 2 1 1 5 5 2 16
msbLiSs 2 1 5 4 2 1 15
SammyStorm 1 4 july 3 2 dec 10
imahima 4 1 1 2 1 dec 9
XanthochromeSum may 5 1 1 1 1 9
whonose may 2 july 1 1 5 9
RachelsMommy may june july 2 4 3 9
bane_vixen 1 1 2 1 sept 2 7
tim00 5 1 july aug sept dec 6
SleepingCutie may 2 2 1 1 dec 6
pallyatheart 1 3 1 aug sept dec 5
detachable 2 1 july aug sept 2 5
LaMangust may june 3 1 sept 1 5
AznQuarter may june july aug 1 4 5
onigiri may june 1 1 3 dec 5
crotchety_old_man 3 june july 1 sept dec 4
SweetLilV may 2 1 aug 1 dec 4
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